One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

Hadar Thomas Perry Roey Biran The project is inspired by the escape scene at the end of the movie in which ‘The Chief’ wants to escape together with McMurphy (Jack Nicholson). But then the ‘Chief’ discovers that McMurphy, who returned…

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

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Hadar Thomas Perry
Roey Biran

The project is inspired by the escape scene at the end of the movie in which ‘The Chief’ wants to escape together with McMurphy (Jack Nicholson). But then the ‘Chief’ discovers that McMurphy, who returned after undergoing a lobotomy, became an unresponsive and physically limp. The ‘chief’ does not want to leave him in the ward in such a situation, and he strangles him to death in a pillow, uproots the marble fountain, breaks the window with it and escapes from the psychiatric hospital.
The participant in the game is imprisoned in a ruined hall where the psychiatric patients stayed, moves through its ruins and must find the water fountain to dislodge it as in the movie and break the window with its help and escape
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is a 1975 American drama film directed by-
Milos Furman- a Czech-American film director, screenwriter, actor, and professor who rose to fame in his native Czechoslovakia before emigrating to the United States in 1968.
Starring Jack Nicholson and Louise Fletcher. The film is based on a book of the same name written in 1962 by Ken Kizi, an anti-establishment activist in the United States, and shot in a hospital in the state of Oregon, where the book’s plot was written.
The plot takes place in a psychiatric hospital and revolves around a person who has been hospitalized for diagnosis and observation and opens the eyes of other patients to the injustices committed in them in the name of psychiatry. The film attacks psychiatric practices, presenting them as a cynical tool for oppression and even punishment. The film garnered a lot of attention and caused a significant change in public attitude towards issues related to psychiatry, such as forced hospitalization, lobotomy and electric shock therapy.
The film became a cult film and was voted in 1998 one of the 100 Best Films in the History of American Cinema.

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